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Simply Slouchy

Slouch Cowl This week we have another project that features short rows, but of a different variety. While the popular Butterfly Shawl from last week used dynamic color changes to wonderful effect, the two projects featured today focus more on fiber content and texture rather than color.

This week we have another project that features short rows, but of a different variety. While the popular Butterfly Shawl from last week used dynamic color changes to wonderful effect, the two projects featured today focus more on fiber content and texture rather than color.

The Slouch Cowl by Elizabeth Elliott uses monochrome stripes of two Shibui Yarns: Birch and Pebble. The slight difference in color comes from how these two yarns react to the dyeing process. Below is a close up of these two yarns: Birch on the left and Pebble on the right.

Shibui Birch and Pebble Yarn
Shibui Birch
100% extra fine merino
Shibui Pebble
48% silk, 36% merino, 16% cashmere

You can see that the 100% merino yarn takes the dye as a true solid, but the blend of silk/merino/cashmere gives the same color a tweedy effect. By striping these two yarns together in some swooping short rows, Elliott achieves a dynamic, interesting, yet subtle result.

In general, the Pebble color is a less saturated version of the Birch color. This is even more apparent in darker colors, like Abyss (shown below in Slouch Hat 3). It is less obvious in the mid to light toned colors.

Slouch Hat 3 also utilized short rows to create an extra slouchy beanie. While last week we looked at wrap and turn, Elliott uses German Short Rows. Which short row technique you use is personal preference, although it is worth testing a couple out to see which you like best! Many people love the near seamless appearance and ease of execution of German Short Rows


Did You Know...
German Short Rows:
Creating Short Rows:
  • Step 1 (RS): Work to the stitch specified in your pattern.
  • Step 2: Turn the work so the wrong side is facing.
  • Step 3: Slip the stitch from left to right needle purlwise with yarn in front.
  • Step 4: Pull the yarn to the back of the work OVER TOP of the right needle. This will distort the stitch, creating the appearance of a doubled stitch.
  • Step 5: Bring the yarn to the front BETWEEN the needles to begin purling.
  • Step 6: Keeping a tighter tension than usual for the first few stitches, work to the stitch specified in your pattern.
  • Step 7: Turn the work so the right side is facing.
  • Step 8: Bring the yarn to the front BETWEEN the needles.
  • Step 9: Slip the stitch from the left needle to the right needle purlwise with the yarn in front.
  • Step 10: Pull the yarn to the back of the work OVER TOP of the right needle. This will distort the stitch, creating the appearance of a doubled stitch.
Continue in this fashion as specified in your pattern, creating your doubled stitches.
Picking Up Double Stitches:
  • Step 1 (RS): Work to the doubled stitch.
  • Step 2: Work the the doubled stitch as if it were one (like a knit 2 together).
  • Step 3 (WS): Work to the doubled stitch.
  • Step 4: Work the doubled stitch as if it were one (like a purl 2 together).

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